Colophon

Disclaimer

This site is published by Luis A. Apiolaza (about) in Christchurch, New Zealand. These pages, as well as Quantum Forest and my tweets, reflect only personal views and have no relationship with anybody else’s, including my family members, friends, and employer.

Retweets and likes are not endorsements but a ‘look at this’, ‘file for later reading’ or simply ‘this is funny and ridiculous’.

Do you have constructive comments and suggestions? Please send them to hey@luis.apiolaza.net.

Copyright

Most pages—including text and graphics—are my copyright (1997–2017) and some rights are reserved. Exception: for many journal articles I have transferred the copyright to the publishers (it sucks, I know). This is probably the appropriate place to mention that I support the Electronic Frontier Foundation ‘defending our rights in the digital world’.

Tools

This site uses static HTML pages generated from Markdown files using Hugo. Most often I write the pages in TextMate.

Past tools

At the dawn of time—well, 1997—I wrote this site directly in HTML using Windows Notepad. Around 1999 I moved to Arachnophilia. By 2005 all pages ended up in PmWiki, a text back-end wiki. After 5 years I went back to simpler times, relying only on text files. However, writing HTML by hand becomes painful really quickly, so the choice of Markdown.

There are a few systems that can generate a blog from text files, and I initially wrote publon.py, a crummy looking python script based around markdown and pygments. By the way, a publon is the minimum publishable unit, a tongue-in-cheek definition that I first found in ‘A Ph.D. is not enough’ by Peter Feibelman. In early 2016 I plugged my Markdown pages with almost no changes into Hugo; actually the only change required was to add the layout: page keyword to the preamble of my files.

The site was complemented with a weblog (Quantum Forest, although with a different emphasis from the current one, run using Textpattern) starting in 2003. Textpattern gave place to Wordpress in 2008. In early 2010 I got really bored of the hassle of maintaining server software and started using Tumblr. I thought that the ephemeral nature of blog posts did not warrant fretting about putting the content in someone else’s servers. This idea was short-lived once I discovered that I could not add equations and other things I needed to communicate.